Help us reach more people. All the funds will be used to improve the website!

Showing posts with label Diaspora. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Diaspora. Show all posts

The downfall of Mbeki: The hidden truth











John Pilger

The political rupture in South Africa is being presented in the outside world as the personal tragedy and humiliation of one man, Thabo Mbeki. It is reminiscent of the beatification of Nelson Mandela at the death of apartheid.

White Scams Part 4: DEADLY GAMES

By Sicebise Msengana







Hey Becky watch your filthy mouth about Black women!

When Black men lack self-control & are throughly brainwashed, they're set up for DESTRUCTION & GENOCIDE!

As an African man, I don't think it is a wise thing for brothas to sit idle & not protect the image of Black women. Why? Your DIGNITY & MANHOOD depends on how Black women are treated.

As long as Black women are DEGRADED, BASHED & UNPROTECTED, you won't make it in this existing political & economic system. To compete with European and Asian males, Black men need to build economic power, political clout and control all industries with Black women.

Africa Manhood Part 4

By Sicebise Msengana










I make no apologies! The African man is the only "crush" that a Black woman should aspire to have in her life. The African man is the only bull in the kraal.

The Black Community Needs To Practice Group Economics

By Sicebise Msengana










Onitaset Kumat makes excellent remarks "It’s sad, but our recent rap culture, with its excesses on jewelery, automobiles and fashion has minimized the African’s natural quest for

African Manhood Part III: Xhosa Men

By Sicebise Msengana










Sacrifice is part of Afrikan manhood. We sacrifice ourselves for those we love.  Afrikan men practice love to Afrikan women by supporting Black families and providing leadership.

Weekend Inspiration: Baby Making Music by Luther Vandross

By Sicebise Msengana








Have you ever been in love? How does it feel to  constantly think about someone special?

Love can make us do CRAZY things at times. Scientific research has proven that love can make us act in ways that we would not normally do because of the feelings of love.

A 4 Step Guide to Africa: Africans according to Whites and Asians

By Sicebise Msengana











#1 RACIAL THEORY: “We hate Africans because they are an inferior race."

“Whether we like it or not, Africans are lazy, stupid and inherently violent animals destined for perpetual slavery... .”—said white supremacists and Asian racists.

The Final Wake Up Call: Africans, You Are On Your Own Pt2

By Sicebise Msengana













Although Tunde Obadina’s tone absolves the perpetrators, he writes:
‘The triangular slave trade was a major part in the early stages of the emergence of the international market. The role of slave-trading African ruling classes in this market is not radically different from the position of the African elite in today's global economy. They both traded the resources of their people for their own gratification and prosperity.’


Behind oppressed black people; there are white people. So Africans must be careful with being the scapegoat  to take the blame for the problems created by the white supremacy system. While all the American/European colonial powers refused to take responsibility for their genocidal actions and got away scot free – yet again – ‘Blaming the victim’ is now the focus of everyone’s attention and is all out for the public to see.

But this time we are going to look at the continued submission of Africans to the system that oppresses them. The demise of Africa is hugely tied to the Uncle Tom leadership that have been trained by the Europeans in white institutions and then s(e)lected for our people by these same whites as "spokesmen" for our people.

There’s an old proverb that says: you can feed a hen, but you can’t make it fat. OK, that’s not a proverb, and it’s not popular.  The point is that you can’t force anyone to do anything. If  African people refuse to shoulder some of the burdens and decide that nothing is never their fault. Then learned helplessness allows Africans to become emotional vampires who complain about never-ending array of injustices that come their way.

What about the numerous  times Africans refuse to come together and collectively, work to solve their problems? What about the times Africans will kill each other, e.g. xenophobic attacks on the  so-called foreign nationals in South Africa? Africans will forgive White people, Asians (i.e. Arabs, Jews, Indians etc.) and everyone else. But they can’t forgive themselves. African-Americans forgave white slave-traders, but can’t forgive their African brothers and sisters. African South Africans forgave apartheid war criminals, but can’t live in peace with other Africans. To them, if you’re black, not native to South Africa and therefore, ‘you’re a foreigner. Die!’

So mentally enslaved, Africans rather love everyone except themselves. Sometimes I look at my blood relatives in South Africa who identify with their oppressors and think to myself, ‘Africans are long-suffering that our need to belong cripples our common sense to the extent that Africans are willing to participate in self-inflicted destructive behaviours (the urge to embrace others, even if they don’t embrace Africans), that are not in the interests of the African people.’
Imagine if we Africans could redirect those emphatic, warm feelings towards ourselves. How better off we could be.
 Africans collectively refuse to listen to Dr. John Clarke’s words ‘You have no friends.’ What will it take for Africans to wake up and see the writing on the wall? It is a dog-eat-dog world. Nobody cares for Africans. From China to India, ‘Africans are collateral assests for the entire world.’

Africa has been invaded for  over 3000 years, and we have no learnt nothing from it. Non-Africans were able to communicate and act upon those racial stereotypes such as African sub-humanity based on  centuries of scientific racism.

Why do Africans keep appealing to the compassion of people who clearly don’t care? Why keep begging the system of exploitation to give you back your lands or integrate yourself into it? That’s ignorance. Because any genocidal law (and racial slurs) that threatens the livelihoods of Africans, deserves to be broken or disobeyed. There’s  no law in this universe that says ‘Africans are inferior’, instead we have a bunch of genocidal legislations and negative racial attitudes that were artificially created by war criminals, child rapists and race thugs.

These are just nothing but symptoms of being a naive, immature and a political gullible people. White people and Asians oppress you for over 3000 years, and you don’t catch up. What do you call that? Intelligence or ignorance? The latter option perfectly describe Africans not unless they change and experience an epiphany (a total change of heart).

Land reform is a priority for Africans. Before we begin talking about ‘saving Africa’, let’s talk about the land in foreign invaders’ hands.

Africans must save themselves and stop asking Non-Africans, if they feel bad about Africa belonging to Africans. White people and other Non-Africans are well aware that Africa isn’t their homeland. They know they don’t belong here. But it’s Africans who have illusions about their identity and ancestral lands.

The solutions to African problems must come from nobody but Africans themselves. Take what you can and let everyone else jump off a cliff. Take what you know belongs to you. Stop debating whether Africa belongs to Africans or not.  There’s no debate. Stop seeking Non-African validation program  such as ‘Black Lives Matter’ because convincing Whites, Arabs, Indians, Chinese and many other Non-Africans that Africans are not inferior is a waste of time and energy.


The Final Wake Up Call: Africans, You Are On Your Own Pt2

By Sicebise Msengana













Although Tunde Obadina’s tone absolves the perpetrators, he writes:
‘The triangular slave trade was a major part in the early stages of the emergence of the international market. The role of slave-trading African ruling classes in this market is not radically different from the position of the African elite in today's global economy. They both traded the resources of their people for their own gratification and prosperity.’

The Final Wake Up Call: Africans, you Are On Your Own Pt 1

By Sicebise Msengana









Let’s correct these racist assumptions made by white people, including Uncle Toms.  African(Blacks) people aren’t oppressed because they are ‘inferior’ or something.
They are oppressed because they have not yet decided to be free and extract themselves from the shackles, and a cruel, evil system ever imposed on a group of people for over 500

Modern African Traditional Clothing

By Sicebise Msengana










The feelings of so-called civilisation are mixed. What may appear as 'civilisation' might be instincts.

"My  own  impression,  from  having  divided  my  life  between United  States  cities  and  New  Guinea  villages,  is  that  the  so-called  blessings of  civilization  are  mixed.  For  example,  compared  with  hunter-gatherers, citizens  of  modern  industrialized  states  enjoy  better  medical  care,  lower risk  of  death  by  homicide,  and  a  longer  life  span,  but  receive  much  less social  support  from  friendships  and  extended  families.  My  motive  for investigating  these  geographic  differences  in  human  societies

Let's Not Cry A River For Africans

By Sicebise Msengana












"Political power grows out of the barrel of a gun." --Mao

I will continue to say that there are no tears for people who fail to protect themselves. Therefore we should not cry for the African whose lands are in European hands because they're of hurting white people's feelings. Similarly, we should not wail and weep for our people in America who continue to march, sing and beg white people for basic human rights,  while being gunned down by predatory vicious cops.

White people: Join us or Leave us Alone

By Sicebise Msengana







White people say I’m a “hate teacher...racist.” Another white person said I should remove the “human rights activist” description on my online profile because I “hate” white people.  To a certain point, I’m a hate teacher. I hate racism and racists.  I don’t  love a heinous ideology of systematic oppression. An ideology where white people are rewarded  by white supremacy in it’s many forms for simply being white. I always say that white people should prove that they are against racism by their actions, not words. The same measure they put in their own freedoms should be the same measure they  put in ours.
Malcolm X argued “Now if you are with us, all I say is, make the same kind of contribution with us in our struggle for freedom that all white people have always made when they were struggling for their own freedom. You were struggling for your freedom in the Revolutionary War. Your own Patrick Henry said “liberty or death,” and George Washington got the cannons out, and all the rest of them that you taught me to worship as my heroes, they were fighters, they were warriors. But now when the time comes for our freedom, you want to reach back in the bag and grab somebody who’s nonviolent and peaceful and forgiving and long-suffering. I don’t go for that, no.”

Let me tell you a little historical fact. When white people arrived in my country, they took land by force and bullied our ancestors, the Nguni people, pushing them around. Using basic common sense my ancestors fought back against murdering child rapists for about 200 years. But the British colonists being militarily superior asserted their domination. The Xhosa put up a strong resistant against colonial terrorists. Jared Diamond wrote on his book, Guns, Germs, and Steel “the  Xhosa  at  the  Fish  River in  1702,  a  period  of  desperate  fighting  began.  Even  though  Europeans  by then  could  supply  troops  from  their  secure  base  at  the  Cape,  it  took  nine wars  and  175  years  for  their  armies,  advancing  at  an  average  rate  of  less than  one  mile  per  year,  to  subdue  the  Xhosa.” The fatal mistake they made was to trust the white man which attributed to their demise. Sadly even today we see our people falling for the same trick over and over again. White people cannot be trusted under any circumstances, unless they’re proven to be reliable.

With the increase in racist attacks against the African American community and neo-colonisation of Africa perpetuated by whites, it would be madness to have white folks as our allies in the struggle for basic human rights. Trust is earned. If the white community is to make a meaningful contribution in the anti-racist discourse, they should look for answers internally than externally.

Do white people do as mentioned above? No. In fact, they will infiltrate our communities and preach about “love” and “let go of the past”, as if “love” and “letting go” are substitutes for justice. Would white people  ask Jews to “love” and  “forget” the Holocaust , because it’s done and over? No. Because it still has a devastating impact on the Jewish community. Why would whites apply a new set of standards when it comes to non-whites, especially Africans?  White supremacy makes the world be a place where injustices will never decrease and where people will never be able to live together without hate.

 My message to the white community: civilise yourselves and focus on changing yourselves. Preach love and tolerance among other whites than in African community. Any well-meaning white person should invest their time and resources in educating, raising awareness and even considering joining the fight to alleviate the sufferings of their fellow human beings who are trapped in the evils of racism. But if this message is unbearable, then they should leave us alone. Because we can clearly see the false motivations of these “good” white missionaries who act as saviours in the guise of philanthropy. Africans can solve their problems.

References
1. "Guns, Germs, and Steel." Jared  Diamond. P. 397.


White people: Join us or Leave us Alone

By Sicebise Msengana







White people say I’m a “hate teacher...racist.” Another white person said I should remove the “human rights activist” description on my online profile because I “hate” white people.  To a certain point, I’m a hate teacher. I hate racism and racists.  I don’t  love a heinous ideology of systematic oppression. An ideology where white people are rewarded  by white supremacy in it’s many forms for simply being white. I always say that white people should prove that they are against racism by their actions, not words. The same measure they put in their own freedoms should be the same measure they  put in ours.

Great Freedom Fighters of The 21TH Century Part 2

By Sicebise Msengana








Amílcar  Cabral  ( 12 September 1924 – 20 January 1973),  was born in Bafatá, Guinea. He was born to parents, Juvenal Cabral, a Cape Verdean elementary school teacher and Mrs. Iva Pinhel Évora, a shopkeeper. Guinea-Bissau, the small Portuguese colony suffered from exploitation imposed by the backward and despotic Portuguese colonial regime.  Cabral later wrote:
Faced with the power of the main imperialist nations, one is forced to wonder how it was possible for Portugal, an underdeveloped and backward country, to retain its colonies in spite of the redistribution to which the world was subjected. Portuguese colonialism managed to survive despite the sharing-out of Africa made by the imperialist powers at the end of the 19th century because England supported the ambitions of Portugal which, since the treaty of Metwen in 1703 had become a semi-colony of England. England had every interest in using the Portuguese colonies, not only to exploit their economic resources, but also to occupy them as support bases on the route to the Orient, and thus to maintain absolute domination in the Indian Ocean. To counter the greed of the other colonialist powers and to defend its interests in the Portuguese colonies, England found the best solution: it defended the 'rights' of its semi-colony.
After the death of his godmother, Simoa, his father, Juvenal inherited a few tracts of land and moves in the island of Cape Verde with his family. In the 1940s, a severe drought causes widespread starvation, claiming more than 50,000 Cape Verdeans. Chicken bones describes the details of the boy’s life, “This is the atmosphere in which Amílcar Cabral spends his early childhood and adolescent years. If, on one hand, his father gives the example of public conscience and civic engagement, within the limits permitted by Salazar’s fascism, his mother, Iva Évora, on the other, is for young Amílcar an example of love and affection, of family protection and of dedication to her work. Iva labors all day on a sewing machine to help the family overcome, as well as possible, the many crises they have to face. Later in addition to her activities as a seamstress, she gets a job a in a fish-packing factory. Amílcar’s mother and her capacity for self-sacrifice will serve as an example which he will pass to the young militants of the PAIGC.”
He was educated at Mindelo, Cape Verde, and later at the Instituto Superior de Agronomia , in Lisbon, where he founded student movements promoting the cause of liberation for Portuguese colonies across Africa. Cabral completed his training as an agronomist in 1951 and returned to Africa in 1952. 

Describing his yearning for Guinea, “This was done following a plan, an objective, based on the idea of doing something, of contributing to the betterment of the people, to fight against the Portuguese. That’s what I have done since the day I arrived in Guinea." Between  1953 and 1954, Cabral conducted an agricultural survey or census of the colony. The knowledge from the survey helped him better understand the problems facing his country. He and Aristides Pereira, Julio de Almeida, Elisée Turpin, Fernando Fortes, and Luiz Cabral (Amílcar Cabral's half-brother) founded the PAIGC (Partido Africano da Independência da Guiné e Cabo Verde) or African Party for the Independence of Cape Verde and Guinea (PAIGC). The party was responsible for radical change that swept through the country. In the late 50’s and 60’s, the PAIGC fought in a warfare for liberation. By 1969 the PAIGC had two-thirds of the country under its control. They established schools, medical clinics, and courts, as well as People's stores, in these areas. 

Tragically, like all freedom fighters his life came to an end in January 20, 1973, at the hands of Portuguese colonial masters and its puppets. Amílcar is best remembered by his classmates and friends as a person of hard work ethic, a great sense of humour, and ability to make friends.
Writings:

Steve Biko(18 December 1946 – 12 September 1977), is remembered for his role in fighting apartheid. Best known for the “Black Conscious Movement” and slogans like “Black is beautiful.” The boy was born to parents Mzingayi Mathew and Alice 'Mamcete' Biko in Ginsberg Township , in the present-day Eastern Cape province of South Africa. He attended Brownlee Primary School and Charles Morgan Higher Primary School. Later attended the Lovedale High School in 1964, but was soon expelled for his political views. His brother, Khaya said concerning Biko ‘‘Steve was expelled for absolutely no reason at all. But in retrospect I welcome the South African government’s gesture of exposing a really good politician. I had unsuccessfully tried to get Steve interested in politics. The police were able to do in one day what had eluded me for years. This time the great giant was awakened.”

Biko was a bright student and passed with very great grades. He was admitted to Durban Medical School at the University of Natal Non European section (UNNE) in 1966. During that time he helped found the South African Students' Organisation (SASO), which later became the “Black Consciousness Movement.” The BCM aims of the organisation was to install a sense of self- determination through community-upliftment projects.  In 1972, he was expelled for his political activity. The following year he was banned by the apartheid regime. In the following years he met Donald Woods , the editor of Daily Dispatch and became best friends.  In 1975 Steve was arrested and detained for approximately 137 days. However,  he was not charged or put on trial. Around 12 September 1977, Biko was reported dead. According to several accounts, he stripped naked and viciously beaten and sustained serious head injuries. South African History Online: “Lang did not object when police said they were driving Steve to Pretoria, 700km away. This they did, on 11 September, in the back of a van, with Steve still naked, frothing at the mouth, and unable to speak. In Pretoria, a district surgeon examined Steve and tended to him, but it was too late.” 

Writings:

Steve Biko was one of the greatest anti-apartheid activists who was on a mission to liberate both the mind and body of an African. Yet, he ended up dead for simply resisting the Nazikaner government. We might have lost him, but his words and actions are still visible in our lives. After waging a hard and brutal battle. With this, we release Biko to rest. 

References
1. ChickenBones: A Journal. “Amilcar Cabral.” http://www.nathanielturner.com/amilcarcabral.htm (last accessed 20 July 2016). 

2. South African History Online.  “Stephen Biko.”http://www.sahistory.org.za/people/stephen-bantu-biko ( last accessed 25 July 2016). 




Great Freedom Fighters of The 21TH Century Part 2

By Sicebise Msengana








Amílcar  Cabral  ( 12 September 1924 – 20 January 1973),  was born in Bafatá, Guinea. He was born to parents, Juvenal Cabral, a Cape Verdean elementary school teacher and Mrs. Iva Pinhel Évora, a shopkeeper. Guinea-Bissau, the small Portuguese colony suffered from exploitation imposed by the backward and despotic Portuguese colonial regime.  Cabral later wrote:

Great Freedom Fighters of The 21TH Century Part I

By Sicebise Msengana
www.softwareabyss.net



















Malcolm X (May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965), was an African-American activist and outspoken public voice of the Civil Rights Movements in the 60's. He lost his father to white savages. It was not clear who was responsible for cowardly attack but rumors that white racists were responsible for his father's death were widely circulated. He shot to fame when he was featured in a 1959 New York City television broadcast about the Nation of Islam, The Hate That Hate Produced. For the next years, Louise, his mother struggled to support the family.  In late 1938 she had a nervous breakdown and was admitted in a mental hospital. 


After dropping out of school, he began dealing in drugs, robbery and burglary. Malcolm was released from prison for serving six years. Later, he became the minister of Temple No. 7 in Harlem, there he began to talk about Black Nationalism and self-defense. On March 8, 1964, Malcolm X left the Nation of Islam.  After his pilgrimage to Mecca, he visited a several African countries such as Nigeria, Sudan, Egypt and Ghana. His trip to Africa heavily influenced his views on many things including revolution and group economics.


As he was preparing to address the Organization of Afro-American Unity gunmen entered and fatally shot in February 1965. Toady he is a symbol of African militancy, power and bravery. Through his hard work, courage and passion, the sacrifices has paid off liberating millions of people across America and the African continent. He is best remembered by his famous slogan "By any means necessary."


Nelson Mandela (18 July 1918 – 5 December 2013) was a South African anti-apartheid regime and politician. He was born in the village of Mvezo in Umtata. He attended Clarkebury Methodist High School, Engcobo and went to  Healdtown. Later, he attended the University of Fort Hare and the University of the Witwatersrand, where he studied law. In the 40's, he joined in the ANC and rose into prominence in the 50's after the  ANC's 1952 anti-apartheid Defiance Campaign. Despite the propaganda sponsored by the CIA, he was largely a peaceful man. Mandela was never a "hate" teacher  and "terrorist."  he said in the 1964 interview: "There are thousands of people who feel that it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and non-violence — against a government whose only reply is savage attacks on an unarmed and defenseless people. And I think the time has come for us to consider, in the light of our experiences at this day at home, whether the methods which we have applied so far are adequate." 

 Mandela shared liberal views on economics and national liberation just like Gandhi and Martin Luther King. After many unsuccessful attempts at beg and "nonviolent protests, he was frustrated at white response. The Nazikaner (Afrikaner sponsored racism) government wasn't willing to give or share power. In the 1964 he was arrested and and sentenced to 27 years along his co-accused comrades. He was released in the late 80's and led the transition to a democratic South Africa. In 1994, he won with a landslide majority and became the first African president in South African history. In December 2013 he sadly passed away and many people around the globe mourned his passing. 



It's important to to bring into light  other aspects of his life that perhaps were not so heroic.  We have to seen the widespread of unemployment, corruption and crime. Some problems in South Africa illuminate from the failure of dismantling white supremacy, also known as apartheid.  Mandela's legacy has facilitated the continuation of the exploitation ( neo-apartheid) of the African soul using an African face. "He was at the end of his life also a bitter old man, well aware how his very political triumph and his elevation into a universal hero was the mask of a bitter defeat. His universal glory is also a sign that he really didn't disturb the globe order of power," added Slavoj Zizek. 


Martin Luther King (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) an African-American Baptist minister and activist who was a leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movements in the 60'S. Born to  Reverend Martin Luther King Sr., and Alberta Williams King. He attended Booker T. Washington High School and soon was known for his public speaking skills. After winning an oratorical contest sponsored by the Negro Elks Club, he was order to give up his seat for white passengers on a returning bus. He enrolled in   Morehouse College and graduated a B.A. degree in sociology. He later enrolled in  Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester. His doctoral studies in systematic theology at Boston University earned him a Ph.D.  

 Montgomery bus boycott was one of the turning points in Dr. King's life.  Southern Christian Leadership Conference was founded by King, and other civil rights leaders. Martin Luther King was known as leader for leading the masses, touring across the U.S and around the world, giving lectures on nonviolent protest and civil rights. His stances on "nonviolent" principles was influenced by his Christian faith and Gandhi. By the way, " nonviolent" protests never worked. Even Gandhi was wrong on nonviolence. Violence has a place in the world, if the enemy doesn't want to give or share power. Among his marches, the March on Washington still remains as one of the largest political rallies for human rights in United States history. He delivered the famous "I Have a Dream" speech. the famous passageI say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.
I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: 'We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.'I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.I have a dream today.I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.I have a dream today.

Martin Luther King like Malcolm X were targeted by the U.S government. A congressional investigation described the FBI's campaign against King as "one of the most abusive of all FBI programs."  His activism caught up with him in his last days. On  April 4, 1968 at the Lorraine Motel, he shot in the face. The last words of the  Baptist minister were "Precious Lord, Take My Hand." His death is the statement of the triumph of human spirit. He fought and won his battle. We don't have to agree with his liberal views on self-defense and African nationalism.  The F.B.I papers revealed the following about Dr. King: Prevent the RISE OF A "MESSIAH" who could unify, and electrify, the militant black nationalist movement. Malcolm X might have been such a "messiah;" he is the martyr of the movement today. Martin Luther King, Stokely Carmichael and Elijah Muhammed all aspire to this position. Elijah Muhammed is less of a threat because of his age. King could be a very real contender for this position should he abandon his supposed "obedience" to "white, liberal doctrines" (nonviolence) and embrace black nationalism. Carmichael has the necessary charisma to be a real threat in this way." 

The lives of these heroes inspired millions of people into taking action, and fighting for their rights. 


Great Freedom Fighters of The 21TH Century Part I

By Sicebise Msengana
www.softwareabyss.net



















Malcolm X (May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965), was an African-American activist and outspoken public voice of the Civil Rights Movements in the 60's. He lost his father to white savages. It was not clear who was responsible for cowardly attack but rumors that white racists were responsible for his father's death were widely circulated. He shot to fame when he was featured in a 1959 New York City television broadcast about the Nation of Islam, The Hate That Hate Produced. For the next years, Louise, his mother struggled to support the family.  In late 1938 she had a nervous breakdown and was admitted in a mental hospital. 

Remembering Nelson Mandela

By Sicebise Msengana
















"I am not a saint, unless you think of a saint as a sinner who keeps on trying." -Nelson Mandela

I admired him not only for  success in his political career, but also because of his work ethic and courage.

Nelson Mandela was a man who dedicated himself in fighting apartheid. Things didn't have to be this way, but he sacrificed 67 years of his life in service to his people. After the so-called "peaceful" transition to a democratic South Africa,  20 years of power, and the majority of African South Africans are still poor, while whites have  gained significantly from the deal we made with the devil.
  Gillian Schutte writes "the transitional system of reconciliation, which seemed only to benefit white folk – coupled with the implementation of a business-biased macroeconomic policy – whites have continued to benefit hugely from the system. Economic studies have shown that many whites have in fact grown richer in the past 20 years – while the majority of blacks and smaller pockets of whites and minority groups have just grown poorer..."

It's important to to bring into light  other aspects of his life that perhaps were not so heroic.  We have to seen the widespread of unemployment, corruption and crime. Some problems in South Africa illuminate from the failure of dismantling white supremacy, also known as apartheid.  Mandela's legacy has facilitated the continuation of the exploitation ( neo-apartheid) of the African soul using an African face. "He was at the end of his life also a bitter old man, well aware how his very political triumph and his elevation into a universal hero was the mask of a bitter defeat. His universal glory is also a sign that he really didn't disturb the globe order of power," added Slavoj Zizek.

However, one mistake don't outweigh many good deeds, regardless of how bad it is. Mandela's good acts still remain as an example of good leadership. He went to prison for his convictions and spent 27 years, for his beliefs. Not everyone has the courage to do what Madiba did. People are good at talking but nobody can walk the talk. The future of African leadership depends on us young people. It's us who should change the course. Setting our own path. But the message has to clear and uncompromising!

These people who are telling us Africans, to love or be "nonviolent" towards our enemies or wait for freedom in some distant future are teaching criminal philosophies. We should do our best to ignore them. Africans wherever and whenever they're provoked should fight back.

Africans, in my opinion, should fight for justice even if it means breaking the enemy's necks.

Remembering Nelson Mandela

By Sicebise Msengana
















"I am not a saint, unless you think of a saint as a sinner who keeps on trying." -Nelson Mandela

I admired him not only for  success in his political career, but also because of his work ethic and courage.

Nelson Mandela was a man who dedicated himself in fighting apartheid. Things didn't have to be this way, but he sacrificed 67 years of his life in service to his people. After the so-called "peaceful" transition to a democratic South Africa,  20 years of power, and the majority of African South Africans are still poor, while whites have  gained significantly from the deal we made with the devil.